Egg Nutrition Center Blog

Egg Yolk Fact or Fiction

Egg Yolk Fact Fiction

Myth: Egg yolks are loaded with cholesterol.
Fact: Yes, egg yolks are a natural source of dietary cholesterol. But don’t worry! Read myth #2.

Myth: Eating egg yolks will raise your cholesterol levels.
Fiction: Egg were once avoided and criticized for their cholesterol content. However, the totality of scientific research has shown no or little effect between dietary cholesterol and cardiac outcomes. Because of this, government and health organizations have revised their dietary cholesterol recommendations. In fact, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans place no daily limit on dietary cholesterol intake and state:
“A few foods, notably egg yolks and some shellfish, are higher in dietary cholesterol but not saturated fats. Eggs and shellfish can be consumed along with a variety of other choices within and across the subgroup recommendations of the protein foods group.”

Myth: Egg yolks are fattening.
Fiction: Eggs have some fat, but it’s mostly the “good” fat. Eggs can actually help you LOSE fat. The protein in eggs help people feel full and eat less (learn more here).

Myth: All the protein is in the egg white.
Fiction: Nearly half the eggs protein (43%) is found in the yolk.

Myth: Egg whites are perfect for building muscle.
Fact/Fiction: Yes, egg whites are a favorite among some athletes and fitness professionals due to their high-quality protein content, but don’t forget that nearly half the eggs protein (43%) is also found in the yolk. Additionally, a recent study found that eating whole eggs actually resulted in greater muscle protein synthesis than the egg whites alone.

Myth: Always toss the yolk.
Fiction: No! Most of the eggs’ nutrients and nearly half of the protein is found in the yolk. Additionally, egg yolks carry fat-soluble nutrients like vitamin D, E, A, choline, and the antioxidants lutein/zeaxanthin. Plus, the fat, which is mostly unsaturated and found in the egg yolk, aids in the absorption of these essential and important egg components.

 

 

Author: Rachel Bassler, RDN, CSSD, LDN