Egg Resources for Health Professionals

ENC serves as a resource for health professionals in need of current nutrition information to share with their patients.

Below are various tools available for professional education and/or to be shared with consumers.

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Eggs are Nutrient-Rich; an Egg-A-Day is OK

As a registered dietitian I’ve always been asked about “healthy foods”. I know at parties people watch what I take from the buffet table and feel a little uncomfortable eating decadent foods when I’m around. This is strange since my philosophy is to enjoy foods but make a diet of those which supply the most nutrients whenever possible.

This is why I was happy to see the list of “The 10 most healthy foods” posted last week on the HealthKicker blog. This list offers a reasonable list of foods that are both delicious and nutrient rich. The list doesn’t mention only trendy foods that are examples of good marketing but instead foods that have stood the test of time. On the list are berries, dark leafy vegetables, whole grains, fatty fish, dairy, beans/legumes, nuts, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and eggs. Not very radical but reasonable, these foods won’t make you stand out at parties but will help supply the nutrients needed for maintaining good health. In fact, just recently my youngest child who is now officially an adult came home from college and remarked at dinner that he never noticed that I always cook “healthy”. By this he meant, I offer a variety of vegetables at meals and I rarely fry foods or use gravies. I consider it a success that it took so long for him to notice that this was different than what he observed others eating. He hasn’t suffered, but learned to enjoy foods and preparations that are naturally healthy.

I mentioned trendy foods and this is a point worth repeating.  HealthKicker blog points out the various reasons natural foods are full of nutrients. For example, the nutritional content of an egg as a source of high-quality protein, choline, lutein and zeaxanthin is mentioned in relation to the role in pregnancy, eye health and the prevention of age-related macular degeneration.  This is very timely information considering the upcoming release of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines which is our government’s guidance for getting adequate nutrition from the American food supply. In fact, the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee concluded in their scientific report that the consumption of one egg a day is not associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease or stroke in health adults. Now that’s a food trend that good to see is back in style.

– Marcia

Breakfast is important; tips for making it nutritious


breakfast egg bagel

An article posted the other day in the Washington Post, Consumer Reports Insights: Breakfast is important; tips for making it nutritious, discusses the importance of the breakfast meal. With respect to eggs, the author states, “…having (eggs) at breakfast helps dieters lose weight … possibly because they’re so filling that they reduce the chance of overeating later. People with normal levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol who limit their intake of saturated fat can safely eat up to seven eggs a week; those with high LDL should limit themselves to four, or use egg whites or an egg substitute.” Recent research conducted at the University of Connecticut and Louisiana State University, among other places, supports the author’s contentions.

In addition, newer data from the University of Illinois indicates not only the importance of eating breakfast, but also the importance of consuming adequate protein during the breakfast meal to support muscle growth and repair. The typical American eating pattern consists of marginal protein intake at breakfast and lunch, with the largest amount of protein consumed doing the dinner meal. Researchers suggest that protein intake should be spread more evenly throughout the day, with similar quantities (some say as much as 30g per meal) consumed at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Eggs are a great way to ensure optimal protein intake during the breakfast meal.

Another Welcome to Nutrition Over Easy!

Welcome to Nutrition Over Easy, a new blog where seasoned health and nutrition professionals will give their perspective on current nutrition issues of the day. My name is Marcia Greenblum, and – in addition to being a Registered Dietitian for 30 years – I am the Senior Director of Nutrition Education at ENC. My role is to communicate somewhat complex scientific research findings into language that is understandable and actionable. A large part of my role is to monitor developments in the field of nutrition including food and health trends, government policy and regulations, research conclusions or misunderstandings and bring that information to health practitioners. The health practitioner; dietitian, nurse practitioner, physician or physician assistant, is often asked to offer dietary guidance and I try to supply the information they need and clear up misperceptions especially concerning foods like eggs. It is my hope that no one is given inappropriate advice or told to avoid foods that are natural sources of healthy nutrients and everyone is able to make informed choices.

In the coming months, I’ll be posting on Nutrition Over Easy about many different topics, including:

Nutrition in context: How to fit recent scientific findings into a long term healthy diet and lifestyle. What makes sense and what seems like a passing fad, what are the risks vs. the benefits of adhering to certain dietary patterns? I’ll offer the perspective of someone who has participated in experimental research, clinical practice, academia and industry in addition to raising 3 children while working full time.

In addition to enjoying scientific meetings and healthcare professional conferences both for my role with ENC and for professional development, I have always enjoyed cooking and felt comforted when involved with food and its preparation. My husband and I travel extensively and enjoy exploring the best in traditional cuisine as well as the latest in restaurant innovation.

I’m excited to be a contributor to this blog, and I’m looking forward to your feedback and questions!

Welcome to Nutrition Over Easy!

Greetings and welcome to the Egg Nutrition Center’s brand new blog Nutrition Over Easy. My name is Mitch Kanter, and I am the Executive Director of the Egg Nutrition Center. Over the coming weeks, months and (hopefully!) years, this blog will be a growing resource aimed at providing credible information on nutrition topics and related scientific developments and research.

First a little about the Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) and my role: ENC has been in existence for almost 30 years, and is funded by egg producers from across the United States. The mission of ENC is to serve as a credible resource of nutrition and health information, and as the undisputed leader in research and nutrition information related to eggs. ENC funds more than $1 million dollars per year in nutrition science research, and in 2011 we have earmarked almost $2 million dollars for research. We work with leading researchers at many of the top academic institutions in the U.S.

My role at ENC is to oversee the research and education programs that we develop and disseminate. With a great staff of seasoned health professionals on board, two external technical advisory boards at our disposal, as well as access to the various researchers with whom we collaborate, overseeing our programs is an enjoyable, educational and rewarding experience. Not only do I learn something new almost every day, I also get the opportunity to travel the country to attend and speak at scientific and lay meetings and conferences on a regular basis.

When I’m not working at ENC I enjoy spending time with my family (my wife, 3 kids, a dog and a rabbit!). We’re an active family and we enjoy participating in and watching most any sport. Living in Minnesota that generally means hockey for my kids, though they also participate in soccer, baseball, basketball and whatever else seems to be in season at the moment.

Along with my colleagues and future guests, I am very excited to be a contributor to this blog, and I look forward to getting to know many of you!

Take care for now.

Mitch

Mitch Kanter, Ph.D.
Executive Director
Egg Nutrition Center
Park Ridge, Illinois