Nutrition Science

Nutrition research is the underpinning of our programs and outreach. ENC is dedicated to providing accurate and up-to-date information on eggs, nutrition and health. Below is a collection of both ENC-funded research and relevant studies.

To learn more about our competitive research program, click here.

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Whole Eggs for Muscle Growth

Egg Whites

In nutrition science, individual nutrients are often recognized for their specific roles in physiology. We know that calcium is critical for bone health, choline is important for brain development and a lack of vitamin C will result in scurvy. However, whole foods are complex and contain numerous compounds, often leading to effects that extend beyond the sum of their parts.   Continue reading “Whole Eggs for Muscle Growth”

Eggs, Vitamin D and Diabetes

Eggs Vitamin D

Vitamin D plays a number of critical roles in the body. It is essential for calcium absorption and regulation, bone growth and repair, and neuromuscular and immune function, to name a few. In recent years, new research has favorably linked vitamin D to several diseases and conditions, from cancer to obesity. This continues to be an area of active investigation. Continue reading “Eggs, Vitamin D and Diabetes”

More Evidence that Eggs Improve Eye Health

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A new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Research and Ophthalmology, looked at the effects of eating 12 eggs per week on aspects of vision among people with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a leading cause of blindness in the United States and affects over 10 million people. In this study, researchers saw significant improvements in a measure of macular function and retinal health. Continue reading “More Evidence that Eggs Improve Eye Health”

Choline Intakes are Driven by Egg Consumption

Woman Eating Egg Article Cover

Featured article in the September, 2017 Issue of Nutrition Research Update; written by Taylor Wallace, PhD, CFS, FACN, food and nutrition expert, faculty at George Mason University and blogger at www.drtaylorwallace.com.

Did you know that eggs provide the most choline to the U.S. diet?  Each egg yolk contains about 147 mg of choline or about one-fourth of that recommended on the food label.  Our prior research indicated that about 90% of Americans fall short of their choline intake goals. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans for this reason identified choline as an under consumed nutrient in the U.S. diet.  Building on our previous work, our recent analysis “Usual Choline Intakes Are Associated with Egg and Protein Food Consumption in the United States” showed that 92% of pregnant women and 99% of teenagers fail to meet intake recommendations for choline.  Continue reading “Choline Intakes are Driven by Egg Consumption”

Replacing Refined Carbohydrates with Egg Protein and Unsaturated Fatty Acids Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiometabolic Profile

Replacing Refined Carbohydrates Article

Featured article in the July, 2017 Issue of Nutrition Research Update; written by Kevin C Maki, PhD and Orsolya M. Palacios, PhD, RDN from MB Clinical Research and Consulting. 

Consuming a healthful diet and participating in an adequate amount of physical activity are key tools for managing metabolic abnormalities that can increase risk for both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.  A growing body of evidence supports the view that a diet high in refined starches and added sugars exacerbates disturbances in carbohydrate (CHO) metabolism.  Replacement of these macronutrients with protein and/or unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) may help to improve the cardiometabolic risk factor profile.  The research team from the Midwest Biomedical Research: Center for Metabolic & Cardiovascular Health, Glen Ellyn, IL and Great Lakes Clinical Trials, Chicago, IL conducted a trial to evaluate the effects of a combination of egg protein (Epro) and UFA, substituted for refined starches and added sugars, on insulin sensitivity and other cardiometabolic health markers in adults with elevated (≥150 mg/dL) triglycerides (TG).1 Continue reading “Replacing Refined Carbohydrates with Egg Protein and Unsaturated Fatty Acids Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiometabolic Profile”