Eggs Across The Lifespan

Eggs contain a number of nutrients that are essential throughout the lifespan:

  • High-quality protein contains building blocks needed to support healthy bones and muscles. Research suggests that exercise, along with optimal protein intake, can slow the effects of sarcopenia or chronic age-related muscle loss.
  • Choline is essential for normal liver function and brain health. It is especially important during pregnancy to support normal fetal growth and development, and most pregnant women do not consume adequate amounts of choline. Consuming eggs during pregnancy is one solution to choline consumption issues.
  • Lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants that are believed to reduce the risk of developing cataracts and slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that develops with age.

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Foods and My Baby: Perspectives from a Pregnant Mom

NCU Oct 2017 Editorial Website Image

Featured article in the Fall 2017 Issue of Nutrition Close-Up; written by Rachel Bassler, RDN, CSSD, LDN

Most pregnant women are bombarded with health and nutrition information via handouts from their doctor, advice from friends and family, or pregnancy smartphone apps (confession: I have three). Many times, information is geared towards what foods to avoid like raw meat, fish with mercury, unpasteurized cheeses and alcohol. While this information is extremely important for the health and safety of both mother and baby, it’s also crucial to focus on foods and nutrients that are beneficial during pregnancy.

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Choline Intakes are Driven by Egg Consumption

Woman Eating Egg Article Cover

Featured article in the September, 2017 Issue of Nutrition Research Update; written by Taylor Wallace, PhD, CFS, FACN, food and nutrition expert, faculty at George Mason University and blogger at www.drtaylorwallace.com.

Did you know that eggs provide the most choline to the U.S. diet?  Each egg yolk contains about 147 mg of choline or about one-fourth of that recommended on the food label.  Our prior research indicated that about 90% of Americans fall short of their choline intake goals. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans for this reason identified choline as an under consumed nutrient in the U.S. diet.  Building on our previous work, our recent analysis “Usual Choline Intakes Are Associated with Egg and Protein Food Consumption in the United States” showed that 92% of pregnant women and 99% of teenagers fail to meet intake recommendations for choline.  Continue reading “Choline Intakes are Driven by Egg Consumption”

Healthy Aging Month

Healthy Aging Blog Post

September is Healthy Aging Month, a time to focus on the positive aspects of growing older and encourage responsibility for one’s health (physical, social, mental and financial). One way to promote healthy aging is through sound nutrition. Following a balanced diet, rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein can help prolong a healthy life. Additionally, some foods contain specific nutrients that have been shown to benefit older adults. Continue reading “Healthy Aging Month”

Eggs for the Nutritionally Vulnerable

Malnourished Instagraphic - Verticle

Featured article in the Summer 2017 Issue of Nutrition Close-Up; written by Tia M. Rains, PhD

Public health guidance encourages the consumption of nutrient-dense foods to meet vitamin and mineral needs without excessive calorie intake.1 This recommendation applies regardless of age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass, socioeconomic status, etc. But nutritionally vulnerable populations, like malnourished children and food insecure families, might derive a bigger benefit from this strategy than other groups.

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Prioritizing Breakfast: Practical Back-to-School Advice

NCU July 2017 Website Image - Prioritizing Breakfast

Featured article in the Summer 2017 Issue of Nutrition Close-Up; written by Chris Barry, PA-C, MMSC

It’s hard to believe, but back-to-school time is already upon us. As parents scramble to obtain all the necessary school supplies, it is important for clinicians to discuss healthy nutritional strategies with our patients. Breakfast, the most overlooked meal, is where I like to start. Many of my patients don’t feel that breakfast is important, and would rather get a few minutes of extra sleep. Studies have repeatedly shown that large numbers of children skip breakfast every day.1

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