Eggs Across The Lifespan

Eggs contain a number of nutrients that are essential throughout the lifespan:

  • High-quality protein contains building blocks needed to support healthy bones and muscles. Research suggests that exercise, along with optimal protein intake, can slow the effects of sarcopenia or chronic age-related muscle loss.
  • Choline is essential for normal liver function and brain health. It is especially important during pregnancy to support normal fetal growth and development, and most pregnant women do not consume adequate amounts of choline. Consuming eggs during pregnancy is one solution to choline consumption issues.
  • Lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants that are believed to reduce the risk of developing cataracts and slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that develops with age.

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New Research: Eating Eggs at Breakfast May Help With Appetite and Caloric Intake Control in Kids

creative scrambled egg breakfast face shapeAs highlighted in a recent blog, higher protein breakfasts may reduce hunger in kids. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania recently confirmed these results in a study that compared the satiating properties of egg- versus two cereal grain-based breakfasts in children.

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Higher Protein Breakfast Reduces Hunger in Kids

Children having breakfast in the kitchen

If protein at breakfast shows benefits, it may help manage or prevent overweight in kids.

Researchers at the University of Arkansas were interested in weight-related physiologic effects of high carbohydrate and high protein breakfasts among school aged kids. In focusing on kids, they noted that “In the U.S. 32% of children are overweight and 17% obese. Obesity is a major public health concern, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia.” [Baum, 2015] As communities and healthcare professionals look for solutions to the obesity problem, researchers are also working to discover ways to address the issue. Breakfast has been the subject of several studies related to weight loss and maintenance.

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Primary Prevention is a Critical Component in Preventing Pediatric Obesity

Female doctor examining child with stethoscope

Newly updated pediatric report includes specific food recommendations as part of obesity prevention.

In July 2015, the American Academy of Pediatrics published an update to their 2003 clinical report on prevention of pediatric obesity (Daniels, 2015). Obesity prevention is a public health priority because obesity is the most prevalent chronic health condition in pediatrics. Moreover, the report noted:

Although treatment of obesity in the pediatric age group, as well as secondary and tertiary prevention, will remain a key component of a comprehensive strategy to address this public health problem, the results of treatment remain modest, and primary prevention is recognized as a critical part of a sustainable solution

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Protein at Breakfast Improved Glycemic Control in Obese Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

Honey Waffle

High protein, egg-based breakfast affected insulin and incretin responses at a subsequent meal, suggesting breakfast meal composition may be important for those with type 2 diabetes.

With high rates of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. and on the rise globally, there is a need to better understand the impact of macronutrient composition on glucose and insulin homeostasis in this population.

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