Nutritious Dietary Patterns

Dietary patterns (also called eating patterns) are the combinations and quantities of food and beverages consumed over time. Consistent evidence indicates that, in general, a plant-based dietary pattern is more health-promoting than the current average U.S. diet. However, a “plant-based” eating patterns doesn’t mean only plants; pairing high-quality protein foods, like eggs, with plants is essential for the synthesis and maintenance of muscle tissue, and for achieving optimal vitamin and mineral intakes.

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend three healthy eating patterns, all of which include eggs. But what are the sample eating patterns, and what are the key differences between them?

To learn more about healthy eating patterns, including those recommended in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines, and how eggs fit within those patterns, explore the following PowerPoint, and feel free to share it with friends!

Healthy Eating Patterns: How do Eggs Fit?

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Prioritizing Breakfast: Practical Back-to-School Advice

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Featured article in the Summer 2017 Issue of Nutrition Close-Up; written by Chris Barry, PA-C, MMSC

It’s hard to believe, but back-to-school time is already upon us. As parents scramble to obtain all the necessary school supplies, it is important for clinicians to discuss healthy nutritional strategies with our patients. Breakfast, the most overlooked meal, is where I like to start. Many of my patients don’t feel that breakfast is important, and would rather get a few minutes of extra sleep. Studies have repeatedly shown that large numbers of children skip breakfast every day.1

Continue reading “Prioritizing Breakfast: Practical Back-to-School Advice”

Breakfast, a Back-to-School Essential: Resources & Tips for Busy Families

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As parents prepare to send their children back to school, they often think about the essentials – new school backpack, supplies or even new clothes. But do enough parents think about arming their child with a nutritious breakfast? Research shows that children who eat breakfast may have better concentration in the classroom and overall improved health and well-being.1

Below is a variety of resources and information that highlight the importance of breakfast and help families incorporate it into busy weekday routines:

Recipes Articles & Information
Make-Ahead Recipes:

5-minute (or less!) Recipes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Rampersaud GC, et al. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105:743-760.